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Child Support Enforcement Agency

2017 Agency Overview – Approved Budget

Mission
The mission of the Child Support Enforcement Agency is to provide for the establishment and enforcement of child support orders to enhance the economic security and health insurance protection for the children and families of Franklin County.

Strategic Initiatives
1) Child Support Order Establishment: The number of support orders established increased to a record level in 2015 to 83.10% through the use of an automated case processing tool in the form of a targeted work list and implementation of achievement goals. In recent years, demand has decreased from 12,294 in 2014 to 11,479 in 2015. Currently the Agency projects demand in 2016 will decrease further to 11,194. The Agency expects the decrease will continue by about 2% also in each of the subsequent years from 11,194 in 2016 to 10,970 in 2017 to 10,751 in 2018 and to 10,536 in 2019. This decrease is attributable to the reduction of referrals coming over from the Title IV-A interface. Based on 2016 second quarter projection the agency will establish 2,409 support orders. This number is expected to increase each year by a minimal 0.5% each year from 2,409 in 2016 to 2,421 in 2017 to 2,433 in 2018 and to 2,445 in 2019. 2) Paternity Establishment: In 2015, this Agency established paternity on 94.66% of all its cases, breaking all of its previous federal performance records. The improvements made in paternity establishment are the result of a combination of two factors: 1) the Agency increased the number of paternity hearings, and 2) an internal process redesign was implemented. The CSEA continues to increase in overall paternity establishment percentages. The demand for services has however decreased from 1,792 in 2014 to 1,472 in 2015. Based on recent review of second quarter 2016 projections, the agency expects to increase paternity establishment by 2% each year from 1,472 in 2015 to 1,502 in 2016; to 1,532 in 2017; to 1,562 in 2018 and 1,593 in 2019. 3) Child Support Payments Collected: The level of collections was impacted by the recession and has only recently shown signs of recovery. In 2010 the state adopted a new “arrearage and compromise” rule which gave CSEAs the discretion to forgive state arrears up to $5000 on cases that meet certain criteria. The Agency will continue to “right size” support orders within the ability of the obligor to pay. Economic recovery has been slower than expected. Child support obligations owed are showing a pattern of decrease, due to the overall decrease in client wages and hours. Overall percentages of support collected has remained stable as the amounts owing have decreased, collection rates are remaining stable and the agency closed more cases that meet the closure criteria. With continuing innovative enforcement techniques used by staff, the Agency is expecting to increase collections by 0.3% each year from 166,213,767 in 2015 to 166,712,408 in 2016 to 167,212,545 in 2017 to 167,714,183 in 2018 and to 168,217,325 in 2019.

Strategic Issues
1) Program Funding - Dwindling federal and state funding continues to pose a serious challenge for the agency. Effective in 2007, the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005 eliminated CSEA’s ability to use incentives as local matching funds. This put an enormous burden on local agencies to come up with additional matching funds in order to maintain consistent levels of service. Based on the Agency’s current operating budget, the impact of the DRA is a funding loss of up to $4 million dollars in total spending power. Revenue sources outside the county general fund will be maximized by increasing performance, which in turn increases our federal/state incentives, collecting all processing charges that are due and converting cases to Title IV-D to maximize federal financial participation. The Agency is exploring all available funding outside its traditional funding sources, including but not limited to, grant funding. The Agency recently was awarded a federal demonstration grant, Understanding Prospectives: Behavioral Interventions in Child Support (UP-BICS). The CSEA has requested a waiver from the federal Office of Child Support Enforcement (OCSE) in order to participate in a privately funded grant and the CSEA is currently in the process of applying for another federal demonstration grant, Procedural Justice Alternatives to Contempt. The CSEA has permanently reduced staffing level 6% from 283 in 2011 to 268 in 2016. 2) Inter-Governmental Collaborations - Collaborations with community organizations and other governmental agencies will continue to be an essential tool for achieving the Agency’s core goals. In 2016, the Agency will continue to strengthen its partnerships with community organizations, including the Courts, the Clerk's Office, the Prosecutor’s Office, the Sheriff's Department, Children Services and the Probation Department. Also, through collaboration, the Agency will continue to strengthen the communication and service integration between Job and Family Services and the CSEA. The sanction process is critical to the CSEA in order to secure client cooperation on IV-A / IV-D interface cases. Communication between the CSEA and Job and Family Services is essential so that JFS Income Maintenance staff can determine client benefit eligibility. Increased levels of service integration can assure that both parents are receiving supportive services from both Agencies in order for them to maintain their households, become employed and self sufficient, thereby increasing the level of support order collections. 3) Special Federal Grants Programs - In September of 2014, the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services was awarded a five year $1.2 million federal grant for "Behavioral Intervention for Child Support Services” (BICS). The state Office of Child Support (OCS), the Cuyahoga County Child Support Services (CSS), and the Franklin County CSEA are all recipients of this award. The Franklin County CSEA was selected to receive this award based on its project design submitted by OCS, Franklin County CSEA and Cuyahoga CSS. In July 2012, Director Susan Brown attended the Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self Sufficiency (BIAS) Peer Learning Meeting in Washington, D.C. The CSEA's work in Behavioral Economics started as a result of participating in this BIAS Project event which was sponsored and conducted by the Office of Planning Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, and social research firms, MDRC, and ideas42. This unique peer practicum provided an opportunity for human services professionals to interact with economists and psychologists to actively explore behavioral-science approaches to policy development in human service programming. The goal of the current grant, BICS, is to use behavioral design and diagnosis to remove individual and personal obstacles that impact client participation in programming that will benefit them (ie: employment programs; modifications; parenting programs, fatherhood programs, waiver and compromise programs, etc.),which in turn will ultimately result in increased collections and greater performance in program areas. The BICS program will increase the number of child support clients who participate in and complete the order modification process, thereby increasing the reliability of payments. Each time that the Agency has participated in one of these grant projects, it has brought the Agency national attention in its innovative work processes. This attention and the knowledge gained is valuable in that the grant work increases the likelihood that the Agency will be selected for additional grant projects. This work cannot be underestimated, as the Agency was recently approached by a private foundation to implement another grant, based solely on its work in other grants.

Full Time Equivalents (FTEs)

Program: 2016 Approved Budget 2017 Requested Budget 2017 Approved Budget
Parental Heritage Program
31.79
29.55
29.55
Child Support Order Program
25.66
25.51
25.51
Support Order Review Program
14.35
14.65
14.65
Support Payment Program
51.38
51.84
51.84
Case Information Program
76.37
76.54
76.54
Paying Parent Services Program
18.80
19.23
19.23
Order Compliance Incentive Program
40.64
41.48
41.48
Children's Health Protection Program
9.01
9.20
9.20
Total Agency FTEs
268.00
268.00
268.00
Available Resources:

Fund:
2015 Actual 2016 Approved Budget 2017 Requested Budget 2017 Approved Budget % Change 2017 Approved vs. 2016 Approved
Child Support Enforcement Fund
$19,669,146
$21,486,536
$22,139,519
$22,601,245
5.2%
ARRA CSEA Fund
$0
$0
$0
$0
0.0%
Total $19,669,146
$21,486,536
$22,139,519
$22,601,245
5.2%
 
Expense Budget:

Program:
2015 Actual 2016 Approved Budget 2017 Requested Budget 2017 Approved Budget % Change 2017 Approved vs. 2016 Approved
Parental Heritage Program
$2,085,630
$2,440,113
$2,118,435
$2,140,308
-12.3%
Child Support Order Program
$1,863,778
$2,046,553
$2,120,526
$2,140,695
4.6%
Support Order Review Program
$1,028,326
$1,137,978
$1,203,531
$1,214,354
6.7%
Support Payment Program
$3,883,012
$4,190,439
$4,380,799
$4,427,150
5.6%
Case Information Program
$5,417,288
$6,084,963
$6,326,986
$6,377,847
4.8%
Paying Parent Services Program
$1,372,900
$1,514,080
$1,600,900
$1,614,878
6.7%
Order Compliance Incentive Program
$3,017,165
$3,339,328
$3,529,140
$3,558,153
6.6%
Children's Health Protection Program
$684,815
$752,191
$792,386
$800,653
6.4%
Total $19,352,914
$21,505,645
$22,072,703
$22,274,038
3.6%

Link to Agency web site